• Sodium Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 03

    Sodium Deficiency

    Hyponatremia, or low sodium levels, is when the concentration of sodium in your blood is abnormally low. An average blood sodium level is between 135 and 145 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L).

    Read More
  • Iron Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 02

    Iron Deficiency

    Iron deficiency affects up to 5 million Americans each year, making it the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide. An iron deficiency is seen most commonly in children, women who are menstruating or pregnant, and those eating a diet lacking in iron.

    Read More
  • Molybdenum Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 02

    Molybdenum Deficiency

    A molybdenum deficiency is extremely rare. It happens primarily in people with a very rare genetic disorder called molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    Read More
  • Vitamin D Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 02

    Vitamin D Deficiency

    Vitamin D deficiency is a public health crisis, with over one billion people worldwide falling short of their daily requirements. Maintaining adequate levels of vitamin D can be challenging for any busy adult.

    Read More
  • Vitamin A Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 02

    Vitamin A Deficiency

    Vitamin A deficiency is an easily-preventable yet common health concern. Its most common symptom is an eye-condition called xerophthalmia, which is the inability to see in low light (or night blindness), and it can cause permanent blindness if it isn’t treated.

    Read More
  • Magnesium Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 02

    Magnesium Deficiency

    Although magnesium is naturally found in a wide variety of foods, many dietary surveys show that it is eaten in less than recommended amounts. However, these deficiency levels are marginal and not likely to produce symptoms. The body also helps to preserve magnesium levels when stores are low by limiting the amount excreted in urine and absorbing more magnesium in the gut.

    Read More
  • Manganese Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 02

    Manganese Deficiency

    A deficiency of manganese is very rare, and there are no specific groups of people known to be at risk for developing a deficiency.

    Read More
  • Zinc Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 02

    Zinc Deficiency

    Zinc deficiency is rare and usually affects people who can’t absorb the nutrient because of digestive issues. People with liver and kidney disease are also at risk. 

    Read More
  • Calcium Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Calcium Deficiency

    After about age 30, bones start losing calcium which reduces bone strength and leads to osteoporosis, which is characterized by fragile bones. Calcium deficiency can also cause rickets in children and other bone disorders in adults, although these disorders are more commonly caused by vitamin D deficiency.

    Read More
  • Chromium Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Chromium Deficiency

    Although the body only absorbs 5% or less of chromium in the gut, chromium deficiency is rare. The risk of chromium deficiency may increase with pregnancy and lactation, strenuous exercise, and physical stress from infections or trauma.

    Read More
  • Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) Deficiency

    Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency is rare in developed countries, since people usually get enough thiamine from the foods they eat.

    Read More
  • Vitamin E Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin E Deficiency

    Vitamin E is found in a variety of foods, hence its deficiency is rare in healthy people. Vitamin E needs some fat for the digestive system to absorb it. People who have digestive disorders or do not absorb fat properly can develop a vitamin E deficiency.

    Read More
  • Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin B12 (Cyanocobalamin) Deficiency

    Up to 15% of the general population has a vitamin B12 deficiency, making it one of the most common nutrient deficiencies regardless of age, gender, or socioeconomic status. 

    Read More
  • Vitamin B9 (Folate or Folic Acid) Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin B9 (Folate or Folic Acid) Deficiency

    Folate deficiency is uncommon  since it’s found in a wide variety of food. A folate deficiency usually coexists with other nutrient deficiencies because of its strong association with poor diet, alcoholism, and malabsorptive disorders. 

    Read More
  • Vitamin B7 (Biotin) Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin B7 (Biotin) Deficiency

    It’s easy to get caught up in an all-or-nothing mindset — one of the endless traps of perfectionism. Whether we’re applying this to relationships, parenting, diet, or exercise…

    Read More
  • Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) Deficiency

    Vitamin B6 deficiency is uncommon and is usually associated with low concentrations of other B-complex vitamins, such as vitamin B12 and folic acid. A mild deficiency may have no symptoms, but a more severe or prolonged deficiency can affect immunity and skin health. 

    Read More
  • Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) Deficiency

    Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) is present in almost all plant and animal-based foods, so deficiency is rare except in people with severe malnutrition. Primary groups at risk are those with a rare genetic disorder called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    Read More
  • Vitamin B3 (Niacin) Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin B3 (Niacin) Deficiency

    Vitamin B3 (niacin) deficiency is rare in most developed countries. People at the highest risk include those with HIV/AIDS, anorexia nervosa, liver failure, alcohol dependency.

    Read More
  • Vitamin K Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin K Deficiency

    Vitamin K deficiency is rare since most people get adequate amounts from their diet. Additionally, bacteria in your large intestine make vitamin K.

    Read More
  • Vitamin C Deficiency
    By Historic Health Staff
    Nov 01

    Vitamin C Deficiency

    Vitamin C deficiency is rare in developed countries, but it can occur among smokers, or those living with drug and alcohol abuse.

    Read More

DISCOVER FILTERS